Monthly Archives: August 2009

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Today’s Teenagers–the Future of the Church

Perhaps the next time your church has a significant prayer need, you should move your teenagers out of the “future of the church” holding pen and into the ministry of your church by asking them to lead the prayer meeting. Based on my YXL experiences this summer, I have a sneaking suspicion that the adults of your church may be encouraged and challenged

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What do Youth Ministers Do All Day?

If I could offer any advice to youth directors… it would be to make sure that you are constantly communicating to other staff, elders, and parents who you are, what you do, and what is going on in the youth program.

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The Christian Mind: How Should A Christian Think?

The main thing that underscores our being the image of God is namely our ability and capacity to think. How tragic when we do not. People in general, but Christians in particular, face some extremely serious, complicated, and complex issues. The need to know how to think from a Christian perspective has never been more urgent.

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When Kids Hurt: Help for Adults Navigating the Adolescent Maze

What does an author do when he writes an academic youth ministry book that is critically acclaimed in youth ministry circles and sells beyond all expectations? Simple. He writes another book on the same topic only this time he joins with another expert in the field and moves from the academic into the practical. Dr. Chap Clark, Fuller Theological Seminary professor, made the compelling case in his book Hurt: Inside the Mind of Today’s Teenager that teenagers in today’s culture have been systemically abandoned by the adults and institutions that have traditionally cared for them. The resulting effect of this abandonment is a generation of hurting, disenfranchised young people who, somewhat ironically, are actually craving relationships with the very same adults who have abandoned them.

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Learning Evangelism from Jesus

Jerram Barrs has given us a good sequel to his earlier book, The Heart of Evangelism. This book is more focused in dealing with how Jesus approached the subject we would call evangelism. I agree with David Wells. “This is not a book about evangelism technique but about doing evangelism biblically.” In one sense we can say that Jesus did not have a particular methodology in doing evangelism; yet on the other hand, there are certain aspects that are a common thread in his approach. We perhaps should say that Jesus always had an objective in mind, though it was always applied by situation or context.

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Issues Facing Christians Today

Along with The Christian Mind, this book is among the list of several books that I recommend using in making kingdom disciples, or those who know how to think God’s thoughts after Him and apply them to life or how to think with a transformed mind. Blamires deals with the necessity of the concept of the Christian mind while Stott is more hands on with the topic by looking at issues we are facing today.

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The Prayer of the Lord

Whether you feel competent to pray or not, it is always beneficial to rethink prayer – what it is, how to pray, and how not to pray. It is also good to be reminded that the number one object of our prayers is God Himself and His will. R. C. Sproul, in his usual manner of making difficult issues relating to theology and the Christian life accessible to us, has done a good thing in these ten chapters on prayer, focusing on the model prayer we know as the Lord’s Prayer.

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The Doctrines of Grace: Rediscovering the Evangelical Gospel

The book is clear. It is not about any kind of Christianity but Calvinism because Boice believed that Calvinism was good for the church and its abandonment usually led to liberalism. Ryken’s comment in the preface gives you an idea of what the book is all about. From chapter eight, which Ryken calls the most important chapter in the book, Boice wanted to portray a kind of Christianity that was biblically based and theologically rigorous Calvinism but also practical and warm hearted. Ryken said, Boice so “earnestly wanted to convey the warmth and vitality of true Reformed spirituality.”