Comments Off on Called to Sexual Integrity: Part 1

Called to Sexual Integrity: Part 1

It is sometimes thought that Jesus was adding something new to the prohibitions of the Law when he commanded us not to lust after another man’s wife. But, in fact, this prohibition is in the Decalogue, itself. The tenth commandment prohibits coveting our neighbor’s wife and the Hebrew word for covet is also translated lust after. The same is true in the New Testament. EPITHUMEO, which means literally, over-desire, is translated both as lusting and coveting.

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Does Curriculum Make a Difference?

I am responding to two related questions below that focus on curriculum, the main topic in this edition of Equip for Ministry. One is what difference does it make what curriculum we use in our church? A second question has come from pastors who basically ask, why should I get involved in the curriculum used in the church? Several years ago in a random sampling, I found that only one-fourth of the pastors queried knew what curriculum was being used in their Sunday school.

, Comments Off on How Should We Understand “Curriculum”? Part 1

How Should We Understand “Curriculum”? Part 1

We have all used the word curriculum, but not many really know what it means. To most it conveys the material we use. It comes from the Latin meaning “a race.” God’s curriculum, or race, for His children is that in the end we are more like His Son Jesus. What we generally refer to as curriculum is really a curriculum plan. When we use Great Commission’s material for, say, grade three, it is a segment of the overall race that will take a child through the third grade with specific experiences for that quarter and year.

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Evaluating Your Sunday School Curriculum

By Dave Matthews. Part of the church’s responsibility of equipping teachers for a ministry in the church is to provide them with the proper curriculum… A major problem in churches today is choosing a curriculum that is biblically sound and faithful to a correct theological interpretation of Scripture-the redemptive-historical approach. Many churches, independent and denominational, use material that is broadly evangelical and user friendly without discernment of the curriculum’s focus.

Comments Off on The Power Source

The Power Source

Why is it that there seems to be so little evidence of power in the preaching and teaching offered in our churches? The question makes an assumption: Power is lacking. The message might be biblical. And the Bible does say that the Word of God is powerful (Hebrews 4:12). The lesson could be presented in a compelling manner. People respond positively. So, what’s the problem? My answer is that our efforts seem to produce comparatively little change.