PCA Bookstore

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Learning Evangelism from Jesus

Jerram Barrs has given us a good sequel to his earlier book, The Heart of Evangelism. This book is more focused in dealing with how Jesus approached the subject we would call evangelism. I agree with David Wells. “This is not a book about evangelism technique but about doing evangelism biblically.” In one sense we can say that Jesus did not have a particular methodology in doing evangelism; yet on the other hand, there are certain aspects that are a common thread in his approach. We perhaps should say that Jesus always had an objective in mind, though it was always applied by situation or context.

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Issues Facing Christians Today

Along with The Christian Mind, this book is among the list of several books that I recommend using in making kingdom disciples, or those who know how to think God’s thoughts after Him and apply them to life or how to think with a transformed mind. Blamires deals with the necessity of the concept of the Christian mind while Stott is more hands on with the topic by looking at issues we are facing today.

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The Prayer of the Lord

Whether you feel competent to pray or not, it is always beneficial to rethink prayer – what it is, how to pray, and how not to pray. It is also good to be reminded that the number one object of our prayers is God Himself and His will. R. C. Sproul, in his usual manner of making difficult issues relating to theology and the Christian life accessible to us, has done a good thing in these ten chapters on prayer, focusing on the model prayer we know as the Lord’s Prayer.

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The Doctrines of Grace: Rediscovering the Evangelical Gospel

The book is clear. It is not about any kind of Christianity but Calvinism because Boice believed that Calvinism was good for the church and its abandonment usually led to liberalism. Ryken’s comment in the preface gives you an idea of what the book is all about. From chapter eight, which Ryken calls the most important chapter in the book, Boice wanted to portray a kind of Christianity that was biblically based and theologically rigorous Calvinism but also practical and warm hearted. Ryken said, Boice so “earnestly wanted to convey the warmth and vitality of true Reformed spirituality.”

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Bioethics: A Reformed Look at Life and Death Choices

The book reminds us that when we speak of man being in the image of God, it not only applies to his healthy state but his sick one as well. Christians should read and study this book. The church should be challenged to think about its role as it is called to embody the love and grace of God to its members.

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The Leadership Dynamic: A Biblical Model for Raising Effective Leaders

Reeder’s 3-D Leadership paradigm of define, develop and deploy gives a good context for all the specifics in the book. Because one of the main points in the book is to train and disciple leaders and potential leaders, this book will be a valuable tool for a pastor to have and use in discipling church leaders. My recommendation is to read it and use it in the process.

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The Death Penalty on Trial: Taking a Life for a Life Taken

The book starts out the introduction with a challenge. It asks if you could give coherent reasons for your position on the issue of capital punishment. The author then explains that his aim is to challenge the reader “to develop your mind and your understanding about this important and controversial issue so that you are equipped to explain capital punishment from a moral historical and biblical perspective.”

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John Calvin and His Passion for the Majesty of God

This small book would be a good introduction or review of the person and work of the most influential Reformer of the sixteenth century. In his popular style of writing, Piper focuses on what he sees as the central theme in the life and ministry of Calvin, the supremacy and majesty of God. He frequently refers to Calvin’s passion for this theme.

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The Prodigal God

Keller challenges his readers to examine whether they have “an elder-brother” spirit also. Do they believe they deserve better than what God gives them? Do they possess a bitter spirit? Do they feel superior because of their good works? Do they live joyless, slavish lives of fear and uncertainty? Are their prayer lives anemic? Keller contends that the church is full of elder-brother types.