Teachers/Disciplers

A Suggested Three Year Curriculum for Adult Sunday School

CEP has developed a suggested three year curriculum for your adult Sunday school or other discipleship group instruction setting. The curriculum recommends book studies which cover Bible, Doctrine and Christian Living. The curriculum chart further breaks down the recommendations based on the level of spiritual maturity of the participants (eg. non-believers, nurturing young believers, mature believers, and leaders.

Training Left Offensive Tackles for the PCA

By Ken Sande The recent hit movie, The Blind Side, provides a surprisingly vivid illustration of how a well-trained shepherd can serve as a “left offensive tackle” to guard a church and its families from crippling conflict… As everyone in the congregation develops skills and confidence in resolving differences in a biblical manner, the church and its families are far less likely to be blindsided by conflict.

How We Teach and How They Learn, Part 4 – The Imaginative Learner

Each learning style is asking a different question, and unless you as the teacher or preacher understand how to answer that question, you may not reach this learner. (These same learning styles characteristics are true of those sitting in the pews listening to sermons as well. So pastors, listen up.) The Imaginative learner is asking why – why do I need to know this? Convince him or her that what you have to say is important and you will have a willing listener.

Understanding The Church’s Role in Kingdom Education

Understanding the Kingdom of God and its relationship to the church are vitally and strategically important, especially at this time. Many problems, struggles, and divisions have stemmed from either an incorrect view or a misunderstanding or misapplication of the topic. Not only are mainline Protestant churches losing ground, so are the more evangelical churches.

How We Teach and How They Learn, Part 3

Part 1 of this article introduced the subject of learning styles and described the four basic ways we process new information. Part 2 described the way we perceive new information, concrete or abstract, and the different ways we order that new information, sequential or random. Part 3 will explain the three basic ways we take in new information.

How We Teach and How They Learn, Part 2

In order to understand how to teach, learn, or even preach effectively, we must understand how people process information. This is the subject of learning styles. Most teaching and preaching are done according to one’s own learning style. By doing this we miss reaching those who do not learn the same way we do. Did you ever wonder why you were drawn by certain teachers and preachers and not others? It was because they communicated by the same learning style you have.

How We Teach and How They Learn, Part 1

Over the years I have gone to MANY teacher training workshops. What I found interesting is that most of them simply focused on expanding a teacher’s arsenal of methods. After many years of studying the subject of how we learn and process new information, I have discovered that when you lay out all these teaching methods, people will pick those that best fit with their own learning style. This means that we will pick those methods we are comfortable using, but these will not reach as many as three-fourths of our students whose learning style is different from ours.