Teachers/Disciplers

Training the Shepherds: Two Teaching Elders Share Their Wisdom on Taining Their Own Ruling Elders

Two interviews with elders Wallace Tinsley of Filbert Presbyterian Church in Filbert, SC; and Bill Leach of Covenant Presbyterian Church in Harrisonburg, VA. These two elders from very different churches share insights and reasonings behind their churches’ approach to training and preparing leaders for the work of the ministry.

Joyful Servant Leaders

God’s people are sheep. They always have been. They have always needed a Shepherd. From the first time Jacob voiced his recognition of this comforting truth in Genesis 48:15 to the repeated imagery in the book of Revelation, we sheep know the security of having a sovereign, heavenly Shepherd.

The Hidden Curriculum

We teach a great deal by how we communicate. For example, when a student asks an off-topic question with true sincerity and curiosity, how do you deal with it? Do you dismiss the question? Do you tell the student that the question is not important because it has nothing to do with the lesson? Here, your hidden curriculum is how you decide to handle the situation. While we don’t want to get off the topic, we must make sure the students understand that they are important, and their question is important, but at a more appropriate time.

Does Curriculum Make a Difference?

I am responding to two related questions below that focus on curriculum, the main topic in this edition of Equip for Ministry. One is what difference does it make what curriculum we use in our church? A second question has come from pastors who basically ask, why should I get involved in the curriculum used in the church? Several years ago in a random sampling, I found that only one-fourth of the pastors queried knew what curriculum was being used in their Sunday school.

How Should We Understand “Curriculum”? Part 1

We have all used the word curriculum, but not many really know what it means. To most it conveys the material we use. It comes from the Latin meaning “a race.” God’s curriculum, or race, for His children is that in the end we are more like His Son Jesus. What we generally refer to as curriculum is really a curriculum plan. When we use Great Commission’s material for, say, grade three, it is a segment of the overall race that will take a child through the third grade with specific experiences for that quarter and year.

Evaluating Your Sunday School Curriculum

By Dave Matthews. Part of the church’s responsibility of equipping teachers for a ministry in the church is to provide them with the proper curriculum… A major problem in churches today is choosing a curriculum that is biblically sound and faithful to a correct theological interpretation of Scripture-the redemptive-historical approach. Many churches, independent and denominational, use material that is broadly evangelical and user friendly without discernment of the curriculum’s focus.

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The Power Source

Why is it that there seems to be so little evidence of power in the preaching and teaching offered in our churches? The question makes an assumption: Power is lacking. The message might be biblical. And the Bible does say that the Word of God is powerful (Hebrews 4:12). The lesson could be presented in a compelling manner. People respond positively. So, what’s the problem? My answer is that our efforts seem to produce comparatively little change.

The Lost Art and Practice of Family Devotions

By Brad Windsted. No one has to tell me how busy they are as parents in this cyber/new millennium age. Two income homes are now the commonly acceptable and necessary economic structure of many Christian homes. The increasingly fragmented family finds it almost impossible to set aside any time for family fellowship let alone family worship. To have a meal together is now a cherished event reserved more for holidays and seldom seen during the week as conflicting schedules leave us with microwaved suppers and exhausted parents and children.

Small Groups – A Place to Serve

Two negative outcomes are possible when a small group of the same people meet together indefinitely. One is that the group gradually disintegrates. Another is that the group becomes exclusive. Other people aren’t really welcome-even if it’s said that they are.